An Arts and Crafts Exhibition at Minneapolis

by Katherine Louise Smith
The Craftsman (Vol. III, No. 6) March 1903
The third public exhibition of The Society of Arts and Crafts of Minneapolis was held from January 20 to 24 inclusive. Following the private view for friends, on the evening of the nineteenth, the large exhibition room was open to the public both day and evening. The society itself is a small one. It is composed of women who are enthusiasts on the subject, and every effort was made to bring together types of craftsmanship which would be not only a joy to the eye, but of educational value as well…

Of a kindred interest to lovers of leather work as well as to book collectors was the large collection of handsomely bound books from all the leading book binderies in the country. Mr. W. G. White of St. Paul, a bibliophile, showed a loan collection representing each of the best binderies abroad and in this country. This, of course, included Zahn, Matthews, Steikeman [sic] and Zaehnsdorf. Another loan collection was that of Mr. E. D. Brooks of Minneapolis, who is an expert judge of rare and artistic bookbinding. In this, RiviĆ©re and Son and the work of the Woman’s [sic] Guild Binders of London were represented. Chief interest, of course, centered in the Mosher books, of which there were five, one being of green crushed levant, with gold tooling, hand wrought, with application of black leather. There were, also, five crushed levant books from Otto Zahn, which showed to perfection his exquisite tooling and mirror-like polish; books from Miss Ellen Starr of Hull House, from her pupil, Paul Verberg, and the work of Minneapolis binders. Miss Starr’s Fables of Bidpai, in green morocco, with inlaid diaper of roses, was especially pleasing. Of the Minneapolis workers who were represented, Miss Edith Griffith, a graduate pupil Miss Starr, had several books in dark green crushed levant, and Mrs. F. B. Dodge, who is an expert amateur book binder, exhibited three books: one, “Our Ladies’ Tumbler,” printed by Mosher, and bound in crushed levant, with gold tooling and border in red inlays, being especially noticeable. Other fine work was by Professor C. F. McClumpha…